Korea Still Treating Foreigners Like Children (and Criminals)

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I have lived in Korea for almost 15 years. I have a Korean family. I own a business promoting Korean culture. I even voted in the last Korean election.

I also teach English a little in my free time. Because of this, I was required by the Gyeonggi Provincial government via the hagwon association to go to a “teacher training” seminar wa-a-a-a-ay out in Icheon.

Advertisement

Not Incheon.

Icheon.

Map

I like Icheon. Pottery. Rice. Makgeolli. Seo-il Farm. It’s also WAY on the eastern edge of Gyeonggi-do. Far away from where the majority of foreign English teachers live.

The stated purpose of this seminar is to train foreign ESL teachers to be “better teachers.” The real reason is more sinister and clouded with xenophobia.


We’ve had waves of xenophobia since I’ve been here. The big one was Anti-English-Spectrum (2005), which was a vigilante group of men who didn’t like Korean women dating foreign men. They got the ears of the media and politicians, rebranded themselves to be an organization to make schools better, and orchestrated a lot of the questionable immigration policies South Korea. This includes the HIV/AIDS test for E-2 visas, which the U.N. Human Rights people said violated international treaties. That took around a decade to finally get rid of. They fueled this perception of foreigners as being sexually deviant drug addicts. The group is no longer active, but their stench still exists in the public mindset.

In 2007, pedophile Christopher Paul Neil was arrested in Thailand. It hit the news in South Korea that he was a teacher here while committing those acts in Vietnam, Cambodia, and Thailand. Add pedophilia to the list of traits the Korean public attached to foreign English teachers.

I should note that a lot of people much smarter than I have documented that the crime rates for Koreans in Korea is TWO TIMES higher than foreigners.

The MRTC analysis said the average crime rate for Koreans is more than twice that of foreigners at 3,649 crimes per 100,000 people. For foreigners it is 1,585 per 100,000. [Source: Yonhap News]

The blog Popular Gusts of Feeling has been translating and documenting all the anti-foreigner media and the statistics that disprove the negative public sentiment for years.

Against this backdrop, another wave of xenophobia occurred in 2012. There was a journalist strike at the TV stations, so the stations were picking up whatever dreck pieces they could. That was the year the Korean media went all out, warning Korean women about the dangers of foreign men.

It was around this time that a group claiming to represent concerned parents convinced politicians to establish these seminars to teach foreign ESL teachers about Korean law, visa restrictions, and how to assimilate in Korean culture. That’s what this seminar was.

I call it “The Dirty Foreigner Seminar.”


We were on the phone with the people in charge. We explained that I’m an F5 visa, which is like a green card–one step away from citizenship. I have a business to run. I have 15 years of experience, and I don’t need an introductory seminar. They were insistent. I had to attend or the school would be fined. I was hoping to go to a pumpkin carving event with my family, but I cancelled it for this.

What follows is for your entertainment. It’s an illustration of how out of touch a lot of people in charge in Korea are. It’s an example of a giant waste of taxpayers’ money. I just coughed up W3 million in taxes this month, so I’m conscious of that.

Everyone was required to be in Icheon at 8:30 a.m. on a Saturday. Quite an early time when most teachers, especially E-2 visas, don’t have cars. The subways don’t open until 5:00 a.m. There was no way a teacher from my area in west Gyeonggi could make it out there without hitching a ride with someone.

The reason for the time?

So they could finish at lunch time. Then they wouldn’t be obliged to supply food for the attendees.

I closed down my Friday night tour so that I could go to bed early for this. Got up at 5 a.m. and drove in thick fog to Icheon.

I stood in line for registration, and this was what the itinerary was.

Here’s what happened

I live tweeted and live posted on Facebook what was going on. The following comments were from my Facebook wall. This wasn’t just foreigners making fun of this. Koreans were also blasting this clown show. I’ve covered up their identities.

Opening Ceremony

Everyone was called into the auditorium. All Korean seminars have to follow a set formula. No deviations, no matter the subject or audience.

Which meant this.

All foreigners had to stand for the South Korean national anthem. They didn’t tell us to salute, which would have meant that we were pledging our allegiances to a foreign entity. Some friends have been forced to do so at other functions.

Confrontation #1

This was just funny. I mean, it was dumb to bring food in the auditorium. E2 visas don’t have a reputation for common sense or even hygiene. Many tend to look and act like they just got out of their college dorm rooms hungover. The guy was like, “I had no time to eat breakfast.”

Sorry E2’s. I was one of you once. Still a scruffy bunch.

Welcome Speeches

Every event like this you are required to have dignitaries give speeches.

The round peg in a square hole solution?

Have these dignitaries speak in Korean while the English versions of their speeches were projected on the screen.

Cultural Performance

A little entertainment for everyone.

Performance: “Beethoven”

A group that was an offshoot of Nanta made a performance. They worked hard, and they were good. They played that upbeat synthesizer version of Beethoven’s “Pathetique” that you hear all the time in Korea. Even my daughter’s kindergarten class performed this while beating to drums.

The cynical long-term expat in me got annoyed. It’s bad enough that we were forced to attend this. But when the newbie foreigners start acting like they’re having a good time, it only encourages them, guys.

We all drove out to Icheon to see what we could easily see in Seoul?

Welcome to Icheon Sing a Song

Oh man, poor guy. The mayor of Icheon chose to sing “Some Say Love.” I guess because it’s one of the only songs he knows at the noraebang. We all were feeling stressed for him, as his voice cracked and muddled through.

The emcee also said that the mayor loved each and every one of us. Good to know I’m loved.

Performance: “Arirang”

Every single performance that has foreigners in the audience, I think it’s mandated by law to play “Arirang.”

Lectures

Immigration Office Control Law Guide

I’m sure the above title makes sense in Korean.

This is what upset a lot of us. The seminar is really for newbies. A lot of us long timers, including F4 visa “Koreans-by-DNA” (not my wording, Korean-American friend uses it tongue-in-cheek), were forced to attend this thing that had NOTHING to do with us.

Confrontation #2

An F4 visa holder got the microphone in the middle of the immigration guy’s lecture and asked if there would be any information for people with F-series visas. Those are people like Korean-Americans, spouses of Koreans, and permanent residents like me.

“No, I don’t have any information here for you.”

“Then why are we here?”

I started clapping.

There was a back-and-forth while the immigration guy was sweating. The F4 visa holder offered to explain in Korean for him to make it easier.

It’s sad because even the people running the event don’t want to be there. The difference is that they’re getting paid, and we’re not. I’ve given one of these types of lectures before for EPIK. I got paid well.

Everyone just wants to get through this and go home.

The people who need to hear what the F4 visa holder had to say weren’t there.

Back to the “Don’t Be Pedophiles” Lecture

Coded Language: We still remember that foreign pedophile from 2007. MANY more Korean teachers have since been caught diddling students, but that doesn’t matter. That one guy from 2007 makes ALL OF YOU guilty by xeno-association.

Re: Swine flu

In 2009, the H1n1 Swine Flu panic had hit Korea. Their first solution was to quarantine foreign teachers who had just flown into the country. Koreans were allowed to go home.

Only foreigners were quarantined.

The drug case study was of American soldiers smuggling Philopon in cereal boxes.

Since posting this, someone clarified what the Korean media covered up. The source for the Philopon was a Korean-American operation using the U.S. military postal service to smuggle it into the country for Korean use. But the rule in Korea is that if Korean-Americans are good, they’re Korean. If they’re bad, they’re foreigners.

They weren’t English teachers, but you know, they were dirty foreigners.

So don’t do this.

Then someone from the audience piped up to much laughter…

  1. ASSIMILATE!! Resistance if futile. Sure. Koreans have to eat Korean food when traveling abroad, but you’re in Korea. Eat only Korean food. Be an obedient employee. 
  2. Study Korean laws, which are only available in Korean, so you’d better learn Korean quickly.
  3. That was true 20 years ago.
  4. Learn Korean in that short free time you get, even though you can’t use it in your workplace as an English teacher. How better to learn those Korean laws so you won’t be in a big trouble?

Icheon Rice Festival

I had a feeling there was an ulterior motive to forcing everyone to go to Icheon. They were at the tail end of a Rice Festival. So the promoter went on stage to talk about it.

They forced us all out here to help supply the Icheon Rice Festival with foreigners for photo ops.

The presentation was all the usual embarrassing pictures of awkward foreigners being “introduced” to Korean culture. Talking about trying rice and bibimbap as if people who’ve lived here for years had never heard of it.

Introduce Korean Propaganda Culture

One of the Korean propaganda organizations made this video about Korean history. This is VERY DIFFERENT from the history we share on The Dark Side of Seoul Tour (shameless plug).

Dark Side of Seoul

The British narrator was obviously outsourced outside Korea. We have a lot of professional voice actors here who could do it with proper Korean pronunciation, but we got this narration that talked about “King S’jong.”

In the middle of the video, it stopped and restarted.

The video itself was about King Sejong. I actually own and run the Twitter account @KingSejong. But this isn’t all about me.

It was more cultural masturbation and chest beating. What better way to make people appreciate your culture than to talk about how superior yours is to theirs?

So, Korea had invented all these things before the West had.

A Japanese encyclopedia stated that by around 1500, Korea had made around 15 scientific achievements while Japan had zero.

Cue the audience laughing.

The interesting part was the story behind Kind Sejong’s water clock. Even that had to go off the rails with Small Man Syndrome. By trying so hard to make themselves sound big, they were revealing how small they were.

Yes, the video said that. Sejong started the digital revolution. Not Alan Turing. Not Bill Gates. Not Steve Jobs. It was King Sejong.

Know it.

Then it went straight into the drones used in the Pyeongchang Olympics opening ceremony.

Then it got weirder!

We’re used to the overly stretching scientific claims Koreans make that would not hold up in a high school science class:

  • Kimchi cures SARS.
  • Makgeolli can prevent cancer.
  • Korean food increases sperm count.

Here’s one more to add.

Korean bronze diningware prevents more e.coli than Chinese or Japanese diningware.

According to them, scientists say that bronze can have a maximum of 10% tin. But somehow Korean bronze makers defied that scientific law!

Learn How To Be a Good Teacher

Finally! The crux of the program!

He lost us immediately.

The speech was a winding journey of the professor’s English learning.

It started with his story of lusting over his English teacher in middle school, especially when she wore short skirts. Yes, this is another person that people should be eyeing closely. Creeeeeeepy.

None of it was about being a better teacher. No methods or anything.

He asked for questions at the end. Everyone wanted to leave, but of course, someone had to raise their hand and ask about methods. There was someone here who was still under the illusion that this was a serious training seminar.

The professor’s answer?

Board games.

 

We also learned this

  1. OBEY your boss, you lowly employee.
  2. No one cares! So shut up, already! (But at least the mayor of Icheon loves me.)
  3. Hang out at the WA Bar and drink away your pain and loneliness. Because NO ONE CARES!
  4. And yes. Somehow they think an E2 visa making $24,000/year with elementary Korean language skills and no credit can attain a car. 

DONE!

What a waste of time and taxpayers’ money!

Click here for that Korea Herald article “Visa dispute frustrates foreign teachers”<– This right here is typical bullshit.

The more I think about it, the seminar is up there with the HIV/AIDS test in its racist xenophobia. It did all start from a public panic over foreign English teachers molesting kids and smuggling drugs.

Let me flip it over and give this thought paradigm.

Over the years, there have been many stories of Korean-run brothels in the U.S. The U.S. government, especially these days, has been egregiously awful in its treatment of immigrants. Imagine if they also did this.

All Koreans on visas in the U.S. had to attend an annual seminar.

Yes, I know that the seminar in Korea is for English teachers, but in Korea, that’s pretty much the ONLY non-factory job foreigners can get. You don’t see foreign doctors, convenience store owners, and accountants here. Even the foreigners who do own restaurants and such still moonlight as English teachers to make ends meet.

This seminar contains the following:

  • Stand for the American anthem
  • A local country music act singing “Edelweiss”
  • A video about American baseball
  • Benjamin Franklin invented EVERYTHING. His electricity experiments made K-Pop possible.
  • An introduction to a local hot dog festival with “Do you know hot dogs?”
  • A lecture telling Korean women to not be prostitutes
  • A job training lecture told by a former ESL teacher from Korea about all the partying he did and how hard it was to learn Korean

Image result for picard facepalm

 

The post Korea Still Treating Foreigners Like Children (and Criminals) appeared first on ZenKimchi.

Korea Still Treating Foreigners Like Children (and Criminals)

Advertisement

I have lived in Korea for almost 15 years. I have a Korean family. I own a business promoting Korean culture. I even voted in the last Korean election.

I also teach English a little in my free time. Because of this, I was required by the Gyeonggi Provincial government via the hagwon association to go to a “teacher training” seminar wa-a-a-a-ay out in Icheon.

Advertisement

Not Incheon.

Icheon.

Map

I like Icheon. Pottery. Rice. Makgeolli. Seo-il Farm. It’s also WAY on the eastern edge of Gyeonggi-do. Far away from where the majority of foreign English teachers live.

The stated purpose of this seminar is to train foreign ESL teachers to be “better teachers.” The real reason is more sinister and clouded with xenophobia.


We’ve had waves of xenophobia since I’ve been here. The big one was Anti-English-Spectrum (2005), which was a vigilante group of men who didn’t like Korean women dating foreign men. They got the ears of the media and politicians, rebranded themselves to be an organization to make schools better, and orchestrated a lot of the questionable immigration policies South Korea. This includes the HIV/AIDS test for E-2 visas, which the U.N. Human Rights people said violated international treaties. That took around a decade to finally get rid of. They fueled this perception of foreigners as being sexually deviant drug addicts. The group is no longer active, but their stench still exists in the public mindset.

In 2007, pedophile Christopher Paul Neil was arrested in Thailand. It hit the news in South Korea that he was a teacher here while committing those acts in Vietnam, Cambodia, and Thailand. Add pedophilia to the list of traits the Korean public attached to foreign English teachers.

I should note that a lot of people much smarter than I have documented that the crime rates for Koreans in Korea is TWO TIMES higher than foreigners.

The MRTC analysis said the average crime rate for Koreans is more than twice that of foreigners at 3,649 crimes per 100,000 people. For foreigners it is 1,585 per 100,000. [Source: Yonhap News]

The blog Popular Gusts of Feeling has been translating and documenting all the anti-foreigner media and the statistics that disprove the negative public sentiment for years.

Against this backdrop, another wave of xenophobia occurred in 2012. There was a journalist strike at the TV stations, so the stations were picking up whatever dreck pieces they could. That was the year the Korean media went all out, warning Korean women about the dangers of foreign men.

It was around this time that a group claiming to represent concerned parents convinced politicians to establish these seminars to teach foreign ESL teachers about Korean law, visa restrictions, and how to assimilate in Korean culture. That’s what this seminar was.

I call it “The Dirty Foreigner Seminar.”


We were on the phone with the people in charge. We explained that I’m an F5 visa, which is like a green card–one step away from citizenship. I have a business to run. I have 15 years of experience, and I don’t need an introductory seminar. They were insistent. I had to attend or the school would be fined. I was hoping to go to a pumpkin carving event with my family, but I cancelled it for this.

What follows is for your entertainment. It’s an illustration of how out of touch a lot of people in charge in Korea are. It’s an example of a giant waste of taxpayers’ money. I just coughed up W3 million in taxes this month, so I’m conscious of that.

Everyone was required to be in Icheon at 8:30 a.m. on a Saturday. Quite an early time when most teachers, especially E-2 visas, don’t have cars. The subways don’t open until 5:00 a.m. There was no way a teacher from my area in west Gyeonggi could make it out there without hitching a ride with someone.

The reason for the time?

So they could finish at lunch time. Then they wouldn’t be obliged to supply food for the attendees.

I closed down my Friday night tour so that I could go to bed early for this. Got up at 5 a.m. and drove in thick fog to Icheon.

I stood in line for registration, and this was what the itinerary was.

Here’s what happened

I live tweeted and live posted on Facebook what was going on. The following comments were from my Facebook wall. This wasn’t just foreigners making fun of this. Koreans were also blasting this clown show. I’ve covered up their identities.

Opening Ceremony

Everyone was called into the auditorium. All Korean seminars have to follow a set formula. No deviations, no matter the subject or audience.

Which meant this.

All foreigners had to stand for the South Korean national anthem. They didn’t tell us to salute, which would have meant that we were pledging our allegiances to a foreign entity. Some friends have been forced to do so at other functions.

Confrontation #1

This was just funny. I mean, it was dumb to bring food in the auditorium. E2 visas don’t have a reputation for common sense or even hygiene. Many tend to look and act like they just got out of their college dorm rooms hungover. The guy was like, “I had no time to eat breakfast.”

Sorry E2’s. I was one of you once. Still a scruffy bunch.

Welcome Speeches

Every event like this you are required to have dignitaries give speeches.

The round peg in a square hole solution?

Have these dignitaries speak in Korean while the English versions of their speeches were projected on the screen.

Cultural Performance

A little entertainment for everyone.

Performance: “Beethoven”

A group that was an offshoot of Nanta made a performance. They worked hard, and they were good. They played that upbeat synthesizer version of Beethoven’s “Pathetique” that you hear all the time in Korea. Even my daughter’s kindergarten class performed this while beating to drums.

The cynical long-term expat in me got annoyed. It’s bad enough that we were forced to attend this. But when the newbie foreigners start acting like they’re having a good time, it only encourages them, guys.

We all drove out to Icheon to see what we could easily see in Seoul?

Welcome to Icheon Sing a Song

Oh man, poor guy. The mayor of Icheon chose to sing “Some Say Love.” I guess because it’s one of the only songs he knows at the noraebang. We all were feeling stressed for him, as his voice cracked and muddled through.

The emcee also said that the mayor loved each and every one of us. Good to know I’m loved.

Performance: “Arirang”

Every single performance that has foreigners in the audience, I think it’s mandated by law to play “Arirang.”

Lectures

Immigration Office Control Law Guide

I’m sure the above title makes sense in Korean.

This is what upset a lot of us. The seminar is really for newbies. A lot of us long timers, including F4 visa “Koreans-by-DNA” (not my wording, Korean-American friend uses it tongue-in-cheek), were forced to attend this thing that had NOTHING to do with us.

Confrontation #2

An F4 visa holder got the microphone in the middle of the immigration guy’s lecture and asked if there would be any information for people with F-series visas. Those are people like Korean-Americans, spouses of Koreans, and permanent residents like me.

“No, I don’t have any information here for you.”

“Then why are we here?”

I started clapping.

There was a back-and-forth while the immigration guy was sweating. The F4 visa holder offered to explain in Korean for him to make it easier.

It’s sad because even the people running the event don’t want to be there. The difference is that they’re getting paid, and we’re not. I’ve given one of these types of lectures before for EPIK. I got paid well.

Everyone just wants to get through this and go home.

The people who need to hear what the F4 visa holder had to say weren’t there.

Back to the “Don’t Be Pedophiles” Lecture

Coded Language: We still remember that foreign pedophile from 2007. MANY more Korean teachers have since been caught diddling students, but that doesn’t matter. That one guy from 2007 makes ALL OF YOU guilty by xeno-association.

Re: Swine flu

In 2009, the H1n1 Swine Flu panic had hit Korea. Their first solution was to quarantine foreign teachers who had just flown into the country. Koreans were allowed to go home.

Only foreigners were quarantined.

The drug case study was of American soldiers smuggling Philopon in cereal boxes.

Since posting this, someone clarified what the Korean media covered up. The source for the Philopon was a Korean-American operation using the U.S. military postal service to smuggle it into the country for Korean use. But the rule in Korea is that if Korean-Americans are good, they’re Korean. If they’re bad, they’re foreigners.

They weren’t English teachers, but you know, they were dirty foreigners.

So don’t do this.

Then someone from the audience piped up to much laughter…

  1. ASSIMILATE!! Resistance if futile. Sure. Koreans have to eat Korean food when traveling abroad, but you’re in Korea. Eat only Korean food. Be an obedient employee. 
  2. Study Korean laws, which are only available in Korean, so you’d better learn Korean quickly.
  3. That was true 20 years ago.
  4. Learn Korean in that short free time you get, even though you can’t use it in your workplace as an English teacher. How better to learn those Korean laws so you won’t be in a big trouble?

Icheon Rice Festival

I had a feeling there was an ulterior motive to forcing everyone to go to Icheon. They were at the tail end of a Rice Festival. So the promoter went on stage to talk about it.

They forced us all out here to help supply the Icheon Rice Festival with foreigners for photo ops.

The presentation was all the usual embarrassing pictures of awkward foreigners being “introduced” to Korean culture. Talking about trying rice and bibimbap as if people who’ve lived here for years had never heard of it.

Introduce Korean Propaganda Culture

One of the Korean propaganda organizations made this video about Korean history. This is VERY DIFFERENT from the history we share on The Dark Side of Seoul Tour (shameless plug).

Dark Side of Seoul

The British narrator was obviously outsourced outside Korea. We have a lot of professional voice actors here who could do it with proper Korean pronunciation, but we got this narration that talked about “King S’jong.”

In the middle of the video, it stopped and restarted.

The video itself was about King Sejong. I actually own and run the Twitter account @KingSejong. But this isn’t all about me.

It was more cultural masturbation and chest beating. What better way to make people appreciate your culture than to talk about how superior yours is to theirs?

So, Korea had invented all these things before the West had.

A Japanese encyclopedia stated that by around 1500, Korea had made around 15 scientific achievements while Japan had zero.

Cue the audience laughing.

The interesting part was the story behind Kind Sejong’s water clock. Even that had to go off the rails with Small Man Syndrome. By trying so hard to make themselves sound big, they were revealing how small they were.

Yes, the video said that. Sejong started the digital revolution. Not Alan Turing. Not Bill Gates. Not Steve Jobs. It was King Sejong.

Know it.

Then it went straight into the drones used in the Pyeongchang Olympics opening ceremony.

Then it got weirder!

We’re used to the overly stretching scientific claims Koreans make that would not hold up in a high school science class:

  • Kimchi cures SARS.
  • Makgeolli can prevent cancer.
  • Korean food increases sperm count.

Here’s one more to add.

Korean bronze diningware prevents more e.coli than Chinese or Japanese diningware.

According to them, scientists say that bronze can have a maximum of 10% tin. But somehow Korean bronze makers defied that scientific law!

Learn How To Be a Good Teacher

Finally! The crux of the program!

He lost us immediately.

The speech was a winding journey of the professor’s English learning.

It started with his story of lusting over his English teacher in middle school, especially when she wore short skirts. Yes, this is another person that people should be eyeing closely. Creeeeeeepy.

None of it was about being a better teacher. No methods or anything.

He asked for questions at the end. Everyone wanted to leave, but of course, someone had to raise their hand and ask about methods. There was someone here who was still under the illusion that this was a serious training seminar.

The professor’s answer?

Board games.

 

We also learned this

  1. OBEY your boss, you lowly employee.
  2. No one cares! So shut up, already! (But at least the mayor of Icheon loves me.)
  3. Hang out at the WA Bar and drink away your pain and loneliness. Because NO ONE CARES!
  4. And yes. Somehow they think an E2 visa making $24,000/year with elementary Korean language skills and no credit can attain a car. 

DONE!

What a waste of time and taxpayers’ money!

Click here for that Korea Herald article “Visa dispute frustrates foreign teachers”<– This right here is typical bullshit.

The more I think about it, the seminar is up there with the HIV/AIDS test in its racist xenophobia. It did all start from a public panic over foreign English teachers molesting kids and smuggling drugs.

Let me flip it over and give this thought paradigm.

Over the years, there have been many stories of Korean-run brothels in the U.S. The U.S. government, especially these days, has been egregiously awful in its treatment of immigrants. Imagine if they also did this.

All Koreans on visas in the U.S. had to attend an annual seminar.

Yes, I know that the seminar in Korea is for English teachers, but in Korea, that’s pretty much the ONLY non-factory job foreigners can get. You don’t see foreign doctors, convenience store owners, and accountants here. Even the foreigners who do own restaurants and such still moonlight as English teachers to make ends meet.

This seminar contains the following:

  • Stand for the American anthem
  • A local country music act singing “Edelweiss”
  • A video about American baseball
  • Benjamin Franklin invented EVERYTHING. His electricity experiments made K-Pop possible.
  • An introduction to a local hot dog festival with “Do you know hot dogs?”
  • A lecture telling Korean women to not be prostitutes
  • A job training lecture told by a former ESL teacher from Korea about all the partying he did and how hard it was to learn Korean

Image result for picard facepalm

 

The post Korea Still Treating Foreigners Like Children (and Criminals) appeared first on ZenKimchi.

Gamjatang (Spicy Pork Bone Stew with Potatoes)

Close up of gamjatang in white bowl individual sizeGamjatang is a wonderfully hearty and spicy Korean stew made with pork neck bones and potatoes. It’s a great frugal meal that Koreans enjoyed especially during the cold season. BTW, if you cannot get pork neck bones, you can just use pork ribs and it will still be delicious.

Gamjatang in small white bowl - close up
Gamjatang (Korean Pork Bone Stew)

Gamjatang 감자탕 (Korean Pork Neck Bone Stew) is a dish that was not really common in Seoul when I was growing up. The first time I had it was when my nephew DW was fulfilling his military duties in Korea and my husband and I visited him. My nephew loves to eat (must run in the family) and his request was to eat 2 meals within 5 hrs of his time off with us!!

His 1st request was to eat Gamjatang for lunch and then 2nd was to have Jjajangmyeon and Tangsuyuk (Sweet and Sour Pork) for dinner. And after the early dinner, he wanted to take a box of pizza back to his unit so he could share with his buddies. (more…)

Gamjatang (Spicy Pork Bone Stew with Potatoes)

Close up of gamjatang in white bowl individual sizeGamjatang is a wonderfully hearty and spicy Korean stew made with pork neck bones and potatoes. It’s a great frugal meal that Koreans enjoyed especially during the cold season. BTW, if you cannot get pork neck bones, you can just use pork ribs and it will still be delicious.

Gamjatang in small white bowl - close up
Gamjatang (Korean Pork Bone Stew)

Gamjatang 감자탕 (Korean Pork Neck Bone Stew) is a dish that was not really common in Seoul when I was growing up. The first time I had it was when my nephew DW was fulfilling his military duties in Korea and my husband and I visited him. My nephew loves to eat (must run in the family) and his request was to eat 2 meals within 5 hrs of his time off with us!!

His 1st request was to eat Gamjatang for lunch and then 2nd was to have Jjajangmyeon and Tangsuyuk (Sweet and Sour Pork) for dinner. And after the early dinner, he wanted to take a box of pizza back to his unit so he could share with his buddies. (more…)

Yangbaechu Kimchi (Green Cabbage Kimchi)

Need some quick kimchi? Or can’t find napa cabbage where you are? Try this kimchi recipe made with a head of your normal green cabbage. It’s light, crunchy, and refreshing!

Quick and easy kimchi made with green cabbage

When napa cabbages are not in their prime season during the warm months, green cabbages (called yangbaechu in Korean, 양배추) come in handy for making kimchi. Great for kimchi beginners, this yangbaechu kimchi recipe is a good alternative if you can’t find napa cabbages at your local groceries or need a quick kimchi.

The Korean name for green cabbage, yangbaechu, actually means Western cabbage. Green cabbages are healthy, naturally sweet and crunchy, which makes it a good vegetable for kimchi.

This recipe was originally posted in July 2011. I’ve updated it here with new photos, more information, and an improved recipe.

Unlike napa cabbage (baechu, 배추), you don’t need to salt green cabbage for very long. All you need is about an hour or two to soften the cabbage and bring out the flavors. The salting time varies depending on the cabbage and the salt.

Salting the green cabbage

Koreans use coarse sea salt (aka Korean brining salt) for salting vegetables to make kimchi. It’s natural salt with a coarse texture that was minimally processed. However, if Korean sea salt is unavailable, use your normal kitchen salt. If using finer salt, you’ll need to use less than what’s called for in the recipe.

Quick and easy kimchi made with green cabbage

Yangbaechu kimchi seasonings

While Korean red chili pepper powder (gochugaru, 고추가루) is indispensable for authentic kimchi, this yangbaechu kimchi is a good kimchi for you to experiment with other types of chili pepper powder available to you. Some readers have reported a success with their substitution. Also, if your chili pepper powder is extremely spicy, puree some red bell pepper (or mild fresh red chili peppers) with a little bit of water and mix it with your chili pepper powder. It’ll give the kimchi a bit more red color and flavor.

For a deliciously savory flavor, I used salted shrimp (saeujeot, 새우젓) in this recipe. Use fish sauce instead if preferred. For vegan kimchi, Korean soup soy sauce (guk ganjang, 국간장) is a good substitute. Many years ago while visiting my son who was in Berlin, Germany, at the time, I made this kimchi without any of these ingredients, and it was still very good!

Yangbaechu kimchi is one of my mother’s favorite summer kimchi varieties, so we grew up eating it a lot. She would tell me not to use a lot of seasoning because this kimchi should be light and refreshing. However, feel free to increase the amount of gochugaru or salted shrimp (or fish sauce) to season the kimchi a bit stronger if preferred.

How to store yangbaechu kimchi

Keep the kimchi out at room temperature for a few hours or overnight before storing it in the fridge. You can start eating yangbaechu kimchi right away, but it’ll taste better over a couple of weeks in the fridge. Because it’s lightly seasoned, it’s best consumed within 3 to 4 weeks.

Have you tried this kimchi recipe?  Please rate the recipe below by either clicking the stars or leaving a comment! And make sure to share your creations by tagging me on Instagram! Stay in touch by following me on Pinterest, Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.

Green cabbage kimchi

Yangbaechu Kimchi (Green Cabbage Kimchi)

Need some quick kimchi? Or can’t find napa cabbage where you are? Try this kimchi recipe made with a head of your normal green cabbage. It’s light, crunchy, and refreshing!

  • 1 head green cabbage, 양배추 ((about 2.5 pounds))
  • 4 tablespoons coarse sea salt (less if using table salt, about 3 tablespoons))
  • 3 scallions (roughly chopped)
  • 1/4 cup Korean red chili pepper flakes, gochugaru (고추가루) ((add 1 more tablespoon for spicier kimchi))
  • 3 tablespoons salted shrimp, saeujeot (새우젓) (finely chopped, (or fish sauce))
  • 1 tablespoon sugar
  • 1 tablespoon minced garlic
  • 1/2 teaspoon grated ginger
  1. Remove tough outer leaves of the cabbage if any. Cut the cabbage head into quarters and remove the core from each quarter. Cut each quarter into bite-sized pieces (about 2-inch squares). Rinse the cabbage and drain.

    Yangbaechu kimchi

  2. Place the cabbage in a large bowl. Dissolve the salt in 2 cups of water, and toss well to coat evenly. Leave it for an hour or 2 until the cabbages have softened, flipping over once or twice halfway through or every 30 minutes. Rinse the salted cabbage once, and drain to remove excess water.

    Yangbaechu Kimchi

  3. Mix the chili pepper flakes (gochugaru), saeujeot, sugar, garlic, and ginger with 1/2 cup of water.

    Yangbaechu kimchi

  4. Add the chopped scallions, the gochugaru mix, and 1 cup of water to the salted cabbage. 
    Yangbaechu kimchi
  5. Using a kitchen glove, mix everything well by hand until the cabbage pieces are well coated with the gochugaru mix. 

    Yangbaechu Kimchi

  6. Place in an airtight container or a jar, pressing down hard to remove air pockets. Leave it out in room temperature for half a day or overnight. Then, refrigerate.

This recipe was originally posted in July 2011. I’ve updated it here with new photos, more information and an improved recipe.  

The post Yangbaechu Kimchi (Green Cabbage Kimchi) appeared first on Korean Bapsang.

Yangbaechu Kimchi (Green Cabbage Kimchi)

Need some quick kimchi? Or can’t find napa cabbage where you are? Try this kimchi recipe made with a head of your normal green cabbage. It’s light, crunchy, and refreshing!

Quick and easy kimchi made with green cabbage

When napa cabbages are not in their prime season during the warm months, green cabbages (called yangbaechu in Korean, 양배추) come in handy for making kimchi. Great for kimchi beginners, this yangbaechu kimchi recipe is a good alternative if you can’t find napa cabbages at your local groceries or need a quick kimchi.

The Korean name for green cabbage, yangbaechu, actually means Western cabbage. Green cabbages are healthy, naturally sweet and crunchy, which makes it a good vegetable for kimchi.

This recipe was originally posted in July 2011. I’ve updated it here with new photos, more information, and an improved recipe.

Unlike napa cabbage (baechu, 배추), you don’t need to salt green cabbage for very long. All you need is about an hour or two to soften the cabbage and bring out the flavors. The salting time varies depending on the cabbage and the salt.

Salting the green cabbage

Koreans use coarse sea salt (aka Korean brining salt) for salting vegetables to make kimchi. It’s natural salt with a coarse texture that was minimally processed. However, if Korean sea salt is unavailable, use your normal kitchen salt. If using finer salt, you’ll need to use less than what’s called for in the recipe.

Quick and easy kimchi made with green cabbage

Yangbaechu kimchi seasonings

While Korean red chili pepper powder (gochugaru, 고추가루) is indispensable for authentic kimchi, this yangbaechu kimchi is a good kimchi for you to experiment with other types of chili pepper powder available to you. Some readers have reported a success with their substitution. Also, if your chili pepper powder is extremely spicy, puree some red bell pepper (or mild fresh red chili peppers) with a little bit of water and mix it with your chili pepper powder. It’ll give the kimchi a bit more red color and flavor.

For a deliciously savory flavor, I used salted shrimp (saeujeot, 새우젓) in this recipe. Use fish sauce instead if preferred. For vegan kimchi, Korean soup soy sauce (guk ganjang, 국간장) is a good substitute. Many years ago while visiting my son who was in Berlin, Germany, at the time, I made this kimchi without any of these ingredients, and it was still very good!

Yangbaechu kimchi is one of my mother’s favorite summer kimchi varieties, so we grew up eating it a lot. She would tell me not to use a lot of seasoning because this kimchi should be light and refreshing. However, feel free to increase the amount of gochugaru or salted shrimp (or fish sauce) to season the kimchi a bit stronger if preferred.

How to store yangbaechu kimchi

Keep the kimchi out at room temperature for a few hours or overnight before storing it in the fridge. You can start eating yangbaechu kimchi right away, but it’ll taste better over a couple of weeks in the fridge. Because it’s lightly seasoned, it’s best consumed within 3 to 4 weeks.

Have you tried this kimchi recipe?  Please rate the recipe below by either clicking the stars or leaving a comment! And make sure to share your creations by tagging me on Instagram! Stay in touch by following me on Pinterest, Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.

Green cabbage kimchi

Yangbaechu Kimchi (Green Cabbage Kimchi)

Need some quick kimchi? Or can’t find napa cabbage where you are? Try this kimchi recipe made with a head of your normal green cabbage. It’s light, crunchy, and refreshing!

  • 1 head green cabbage, 양배추 ((about 2.5 pounds))
  • 4 tablespoons coarse sea salt (less if using table salt, about 3 tablespoons))
  • 3 scallions (roughly chopped)
  • 1/4 cup Korean red chili pepper flakes, gochugaru (고추가루) ((add 1 more tablespoon for spicier kimchi))
  • 3 tablespoons salted shrimp, saeujeot (새우젓) (finely chopped, (or fish sauce))
  • 1 tablespoon sugar
  • 1 tablespoon minced garlic
  • 1/2 teaspoon grated ginger
  1. Remove tough outer leaves of the cabbage if any. Cut the cabbage head into quarters and remove the core from each quarter. Cut each quarter into bite-sized pieces (about 2-inch squares). Rinse the cabbage and drain.

    Yangbaechu kimchi

  2. Place the cabbage in a large bowl. Dissolve the salt in 2 cups of water, and toss well to coat evenly. Leave it for an hour or 2 until the cabbages have softened, flipping over once or twice halfway through or every 30 minutes. Rinse the salted cabbage once, and drain to remove excess water.

    Yangbaechu Kimchi

  3. Mix the chili pepper flakes (gochugaru), saeujeot, sugar, garlic, and ginger with 1/2 cup of water.

    Yangbaechu kimchi

  4. Add the chopped scallions, the gochugaru mix, and 1 cup of water to the salted cabbage. 
    Yangbaechu kimchi
  5. Using a kitchen glove, mix everything well by hand until the cabbage pieces are well coated with the gochugaru mix. 

    Yangbaechu Kimchi

  6. Place in an airtight container or a jar, pressing down hard to remove air pockets. Leave it out in room temperature for half a day or overnight. Then, refrigerate.

This recipe was originally posted in July 2011. I’ve updated it here with new photos, more information and an improved recipe.  

The post Yangbaechu Kimchi (Green Cabbage Kimchi) appeared first on Korean Bapsang.

Jjamppong (Spicy Seafood Noodle Soup)

Jjamppong is a popular Korean-Chinese noodle soup! It’s loaded with pork, seafood and vegetables! The combination of all the natural ingredients creates a hearty bowl of soup that is packed with robust flavors. The spiciness will surely clear your sinuses!Korean-Chinese spicy seafood noodle soup

As the weather started to cool around here, I decided to update my jjamppong (짬뽕) recipe that was originally posted in April 2011. Jjamppong (also spelled jjambbong) is a spicy noodle soup, which is one of the two most popular Korean-Chinese dishes alongside jajangmyeon (noodles in a black bean sauce). Often times, Koreans have a hard time choosing between the two when eating out.

Korean-Chinese cuisine was developed by early Chinese immigrants in Korea, and is a huge part of Korean food culture. In Japan, a Chinese restaurant created Champon, a noodle dish loaded with pork, seafood and vegetables in a rich broth. Jjambbong is a similar dish but with lots of red spiciness!

Korean Spicy Seafood noodle soup

You don’t need to go to a Korean-Chinese restaurant to enjoy jajangmyeon and jjambbong. My jjajangmyeon recipe has been a reader’s favorite. Here, you’ll also find it surprisingly easy to make this bowl of spicy noodle soup at home with easy-to-find ingredients.

Jjamppong noodles

Both jajangmyeon and jjambbong dishes use the same type of wheat noodles. Restaurants use hand-pulled noodles, which are nicely chewy, but for home cooking you can find ready made fresh noodles in the refrigerator section of Korean markets as well as dried noodles. They are generally labeled for udon/jajangmyeon (우동, 짜장면) or jungwhamyeon (중화면). Udon noodles for Korean-Chinese cooking is not the same as Japanese udon noodles, which are thicker and softer.

If you can’t find any of these, simply use spaghetti or linguine noodles.

Korean jajangmyeon and jjamppong noodles

How do you make the jjamppong soup?

The soup base is typically made with chicken stock for a rich flavor, but you can also use anchovy broth which gives a lighter taste. I often make it simply with water, and it still tastes delicious.

All the natural ingredients the soup is made with — pork, various vegetables and seafood — contribute to the soup’s robust flavors.

Jjamppong - spicy, hearty seafood noodle soup 

For the meat, pork is classic, but use beef if you want. Of course, you can omit the meat if you want.  

The seafood in this recipe are what you’ll find in a jjambbong dish at a Korean-Chinese restaurants. They are clams, mussels, shrimp, and squid. But, it’s versatile! Use what you like or have.

There many options for vegetables! I used green cabbage, carrot, zucchini, mushrooms, onions, and scallions. Napa cabbage or bok choy will be a good substitute for green cabbage. Bamboo shoots and baby corns will be great additions as well. You’ll only need a little bit of each vegetables.

As always, the spicy level can be adjusted to your taste. You can increase/decrease gochugaru, or even add dried red chili peppers to increase the heat level.

Korean-Chinese Spicy Noodle Soup

Jjamppong (spicy seafood noodle soup)

Jjamppong is a popular Korean-Chinese noodle soup! It’s loaded with pork, seafood and vegetables! The combination of all the natural ingredients creates a hearty bowl of soup that is packed with robust flavors. The spiciness will surely clear your sinuses!

For the vegetables:

  • 1/4 onion (thinly sliced)
  • 1/2 small carrot (about 2 ounces, thinly sliced into 2-inch lengths)
  • 1/2 zucchini (about 3 ounces, thinly sliced into 2-inch lengths)
  • 3 ounces green cabbage (cut into 2-inch lengths (or napa cabbage or bok choy))
  • 2 to 3 fresh shiitake mushrooms (or 2 soaked and thinly sliced)
  • 2 scallions (cut into 2 inch lengths)

For the meat and seafood

  • 3 ounces fatty pork (thinly sliced)
  • 4 – 6 littleneck clams
  • 4 – 6 mussels
  • 4 – 6 shrimp
  • 3 ounces squid (cut into bite sizes (Do not cut squids too small as they shrink a lot when cooked.))

Other ingredients

  • 1 teaspoon julienned or minced ginger
  • 1 tablespoon minced garlic
  • 1 tablespoon Korean chili pepper flakes (gochugaru (adjust for your liking))
  • 1 tablespoon oil (vegetable or canola)
  • 1 tablespoon soy sauce
  • salt and pepper
  • 5 cups of chicken stock (or anchovy broth or water)
  • 2 servings (12 – 14 ounces fresh jajangmyeon/udon noodles)
  1. Have a pot of water ready to cook the noodles. (Turn the heat on when you start cooking the soup ingredients. This way you can time it so that the noodles can be finished cooking at the same time the soup is ready.) While making the soup, cook the noodles according to the package instructions and drain.

  2. Prepare the vegetables.
  3. Prepare the pork and seafood.
  4. Heat a wok or a large pot over high heat. Add the oil, ginger, scallion, gochugaru and soy sauce and stir fry for a minute.
  5. Add the pork and stir fry until the pork is almost cooked, about 2 minutes.

  6. Stir in the onion, carrot, cabbage, zucchini and optional mushrooms, lightly salt, and cook until the vegetables are slightly softened, about 2 minutes, stirring occasionally.
  7. Pour in the chicken stock (or anchovy broth/water) and boil until the vegetables are completely cooked.
  8. Add the seafood starting with the clams, which require more time to cook, followed by the mussels, shrimps and squid. Bring everything to a boil again and cook until the shells have opened. Salt and pepper to taste.
  9. Cook the noodles, rinse in cold water, and drain.

  10. Place a serving of the noodles in a large soup bowl and ladle the soup on top. Serve immediately while piping hot.

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10 Best Korean Pancakes

10 Korean Pancakes Savory to Sweet

Best Korean pancakes from savory to sweet, featuring classic Korean flavors and ingredients like kimchi, gochujang, chive, and buckwheat. Enjoy them for breakfast, as side dishes to any meals, or as snacks. 

10 Korean Pancakes Savory to Sweet
10 Korean Pancakes from Savory to Sweet
10 Best Korean pancakes for you to enjoy any time of the day. These are some of my favorites to whip up as banchan, as snacks or appetizer or even as something to enjoy with Korean makgeolli. When you need just one more banchan for dinner, try making one of the savory pancakes below.

I’ve added the time and quick list of ingredients so you can quickly choose which one to make. First, a little note about the names. What Koreans know as “jeon 전”, “buchimgae 부침개” or “tteok 떡” are commonly translated as “pancake” in English, although each word has some differences.

Jeon means anything that is coated in flour and egg then pan-fried in oil. Buchimgae refers to what can be called as fritters; they usually are mixed batters that are spread out like pancakes and pan-fried in oil. Tteok usually refers to rice cakes but in some instances, although a few, they are used to refer to similar dishes to Buchimgae such as in Bindaetteok and Jangtteok.

In a typical Korean pancake recipe, the main ingredient is generously spotlighted to allow the flavor to take center stage. For example, there’s the kimchi pancake, chive pancake, mung bean pancake, and gochujang pancake. You get the idea! These pancakes are served as side dishes in a meal, and are also popular as snacks, usually with makgeolli.

These Korean pancakes are unlike the classic Western breakfast pancake that you might have in mind. Many of them are savory but I also have a couple of sweet recipes that will change up your usual pancake routine. Try them all from the collection below!!

(more…)

Mandu (Korean Dumplings)

Learn how to make Korean dumplings (mandu) with this easy to follow recipe! They are so delicious and versatile! Dumplings are much easier to make than you think, especially with store-bought dumpling wrappers. Homemade dumplings are well worth the effort!

Deep fried Korean dumplings

I’ve been making some variation of this Korean dumpling recipe for decades. Korean dumplings are called mandu (만두), and they are so delicious and versatile! Hope you make your own dumplings at home with this easy step-by-step mandu recipe. Homemade dumplings are always well worth the effort!

When I make mandu, I make in large quantities and freeze them for later use. My mother used to make them in hundreds, so did my my mother-in-law. We all grew up with fond memories of watching them make these little tasty dumplings, being a helping hand at times, and devouring when they are cooked.

It feels so good to have bags of frozen dumplings in the fridge. They are quick and easy to cook as a delicious snack, appetizer, or a light meal!  

Steamed Korean mandu (dumplings)

There are many variations of mandu. Depending on the filling ingredients, they are called gogi mandu (고기만두, eat as the main ingredient in the filling), yachae mandu (야채만두, vegetables), saewu mandu (새우만두, shrimp) , kimchi mandu (김치만두), and so on.

Also, depending on how they are cooked, they are called jjin mandu (찐만두, steamed), tuigin mandu (튀긴만두, deep fried), gun mandu (군만두, pan fried), or mul mandu (물만두, boiled). My favorite is steamed mandu, followed by boiled ones, but my children prefer either deep-fried or pan-fried for crispy skins.

This mandu recipe recipe was originally posted in September 2009. That was a long time ago! It’s been very popular, but I’ve updated it here with more information, new photos and minor changes to the recipe. 

Pan-fried Korean dumplings (mandu)
Dumpling fillings

Korean dumplings are filled with a mixture of various meats and vegetables. Mandu is so versatile that you can use any type of meat you like (or none at all). I typically use two types of meat/seafood for the complexity of flavor: pork and beef or pork and shrimp.

Common filling vegetables include baechu (베추, napa cabbage), green cabbage, kimchi, bean sprouts, mushrooms, zucchinis, garlic chives, onions, scallions, etc. Tofu and dangmyeon (당면, sweet potato starch noodles) are also common in Korean dumplings.

I like the meat and vegetable ratios in this recipe. The filling is moist and juicy and has a good texture, but you can increase/decrease any ingredient(s) to your liking.

If you want to taste the filling to make sure it’s well seasoned, microwave a teaspoonful of it for 20 to 30 seconds and taste it. Adjust the seasoning as necessary by adding more salt or soy sauce or add more ingredients if too salty. Season lightly, if you plan to serve them with a dipping sauce.  

How to make Korean dumplings (mandu)
Dumpling wrappers

In this recipe, I used store-bought dumpling wrappers I bought at a Korean market. You may be able to find dumpling skins at your local grocery stores. If you want to make homemade wrappers, see my saewu mandu recipe.

The number of wrappers in a package widely varies, ranging from 20 to 50. For this recipe, you’ll need about 40 to 50 round wrappers, depending on the size of the wrapper and how much you use for each one.

How do you fold dumplings?

A dumpling can be fold many different ways. With a little bit of practice, you can add some variation of pleats. The easiest is a half-moon shape, for which you can simply fold the dumpling wrap together and seal by tightly pinching the edges together. You will need to wet the edges of store-bought dumpling wrappers so they can be glued together, which is not necessary for homemade wrappers. If you’re new to making dumplings, be light on the filling for easier folding and crimping.

How to fold dumplings

Tips for freezing

Freeze mandu pieces on a tray without pieces touching for about an hour before storing them in a freezer bag. Otherwise, the mandu skins will get soggy from the moisture in the filling and stick together in the freezing process. You can also freeze cooked mandu the same way. Frozen mandu don’t need to be thawed before being cooked. Just cook a little longer.

More dumpling recipes

Kimchi mandu
Saewu (shrimp) mandu – with homemade wrappers
Hobak (zucchini) mandu – vegan

Have you tried this recipe?  Please rate the recipe below by either clicking the stars or with a comment! And make sure to share your creations by tagging me on Instagram! Stay in touch by following me on Pinterest, Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.

Mandu (Korean dumplings)

Learn how to make Korean dumplings (mandu) with this easy to follow recipe! They are so delicious and versatile! Much easier than you think!

  • 1 package mandu pee (dumpling skins/wrappers (about 40 pieces))

For the filling

  • 8 ounces zucchini (finely chopped)
  • 10 ounces green cabbage (finely chopped)
  • 4 ounces fresh mushrooms (finely chopped (Shiitaki preferably ))
  • 1/2 medium onion (finely chopped)
  • 2 scallions (finely chopped)
  • 1/2 pound ground pork (or other meat if preferred*)
  • 1/4 pound ground beef
  • 1 tablespoon minced garlic
  • 1 to 2 teaspoons finely minced ginger (or juiced)
  • 1 tablespoon soy sauce
  • 1 tablespoon sesame oil
  • 1 egg
  • ¼ teaspoon salt to season the filling and more for salting vegetables
  • 1/8 teaspoon pepper

For the dipping sauce

  • 1 tablespoon soy sauce
  • 1 teaspoon vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon water
  • 1/2 teaspoon sugar
  • pinch of black pepper
  • pinch of red pepper flakes (gochugaru)
  1. Finely chop zucchini and cabbage. 

  2. In two separate bowls, generously sprinkle salt over chopped zucchini and cabbage and set aside (for at least 15 minutes) while preparing other ingredients. (This process will draw out water, soften the texture, and add flavor.) Squeeze out as much water as possible from salted zucchini and cabbage by hand. Transfer to a large mixing bowl.

  3. Prepare all the remaining ingredients and add to the mixing bowl. Mix all ingredients well with your hand.

  4. Place one heaping teaspoonful of the filling on a wrapper. Wet the edges of the wrapper with water and seal tightly (pushing the air out with your fingers) into a half-moon shape. Repeat this process until all the filling/wrappers are used.

Gun mandu (pan fried)

  1. Heat the pan with 2 tablespoons of vegetable oil over medium high heat. Add the dumplings, making sure they aren’t touching each other. Fry for 1 – 2 minutes, until the bottoms are golden brown. Add 1/3 cup of water to the pan, and cover immediately with a lid. Reduce the heat to medium low, and steam for 4 to 5 minutes. OR, cook 2 – 3 minutes each side over medium heat until golden brown without adding water. If the dumplings are frozen, cook a little longer.

Tuigin mandu (deep-fried dumplings)

  1. Heat a deep fryer or skillet with about 2-3 inches of canola or vegetable oil over medium-high heat to 350°F. Fry the dumplings for 2-3 minutes until golden brown.

Jjin mandu (steamed)

  1. Steam the dumplings for about 10 minutes in a steamer (12 minutes if frozen). Make sure to line the steamer with a wet cheesecloth or cabbage leaves to prevent the mandu from sticking.

Mul mandu (boiled)

  1. Bring a pot of water to a boil. Add mandu (stirring gently so they don’t stick to the bottom of the pot), a few at a time, and cook until all of them come up to the surface. Continue to cook for another minute or two.

How to freeze dumplings: Place mandu pieces on a tray without pieces touching and freeze for about an hour before storing them in a freezer bag. Frozen mandu don’t need to be thawed before being cooked. Just cook a little longer.

This mandu recipe recipe was originally posted in September 2009. It’s been very popular, but I’ve updated it here with more information, new photos and minor changes to the recipe. 

 

 

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Dubu Kimchi (Tofu with Stir-fried Kimchi and Pork)

Dubu kimchi is a popular dish made with old kimchi. This recipe is simple and easy! Stir-fry the kimchi and pork and serve with sliced tofu that has been boiled or pan-fried. Simply omit the pork to make it a meatless dish if you like. 
Stir-fried kimchi and pork served with boiled tofu

What’s your favorite way to use up aging kimchi? Dubu kimchi (두부김치) is one of many classic Korean dishes that use sour, old kimchi. The kimchi is stir-fried with fatty pork and served with sliced tofu.

In Korean cooking, kimchi and pork is a classic combination which is used in many different dishes, such as kimchi jjigae. The taste is intoxicating, with the pungency of kimchi and the rich flavor of fatty pork.

This easy dubu kimchi recipe was originally posted in October 2010. It’s been very popular, but I’ve updated it here with more information, new photos and minor changes to the recipe. 

To make dubu kimchi, mix the kimchi, pork and aromatic vegetables with a few basic seasoning ingredients and stir-fry together. 

You can omit the pork to make it a meatless dish if desired! Kimchi stir-fried on its own is still very tasty. 

how to make dubu kimchi

I usually boil the tofu because I like it soft. You can also steam it. Pan-frying will make the tofu a little crispy on the outside, if preferred. 

You can serve this dubu kimchi as a side or a main dish with a bowl of rice. In Korea, dubu kimchi is a popular drinking snack (anju, 안주), especially with Korean alcohol beverage soju (소주) or makgeolli (막걸리). My preference is with makgeolli!

dubu kimchi recipe with pan-fried tofu

More ideas for using up old kimchi
Kimchi jjigae
Kimchi jjim
Kimchi jeon
Kimchi fried rice 
Kimchi mandu
Kimchi soondubu jjigae
 

Did you make and love this dubu kimchi recipe? Please rate the recipe below by either clicking the stars or with a comment! And make sure to share your creations by tagging me on Instagram! Stay in touch by following me on Pinterest, Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.

 
Boiled tofu served with stir-fried kimchi and pork

Dubu Kimchi (Tofu with Stir-fried Kimchi and Pork)

Kimchi is stir-fried with pork and served with sliced tofu that has been boiled, steamed, or pan-fried.

  • 2 cups fully fermented kimchi
  • 1/2 pound thinly sliced pork or pork belly
  • 1/2 onion
  • 2 scallions
  • 1 teaspoon grated ginger
  • 1 tablespoon minced garlic
  • 1 tablespoon soy sauce
  • 1 tablespoon sugar
  • 1 tablespoon sesame oil
  • 2 – 3 tablespoons gochujang (고추장), Korean red chili pepper paste
  • 1 teaspoon sesame seeds
  • pinch pepper
  • 1 18- oz package tofu
  1. Cut kimchi and pork into bite sizes. Thinly slice onion and scallions. In a large bowl, combine kimchi, pork, onion, scallions and the remaining ingredients and mix well. Let it stand for 15 minutes.
  2. In a medium size pot, bring about 4 cups of water to a boil. Cut the tofu into two blocks. Reduce the heat to medium high, and add the tofu. Gently boil for 5 minutes. Carefully transfer the tofu to a colander to drain. Cut each block into about 1/2-inch thick slices.

  3. Heat a large pan over medium high heat and add the kimchi and pork mix. Cook until the kimchi becomes soft, the pork is cooked through, and most of the liquid generated during the cooking process is evaporated, about 5 – 6 minutes.
  4. Arrange the tofu slices nicely on a plate leaving an open space in the middle part. Place the stir-fried kimchi and pork in the middle and serve. Or, you can serve the stir-fried kimchi and tofu side by side. 

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